Inspired Me

visualvibs:

Old Stock-Adobe Illustrator Actions by Borges Lettering.

Old Stock is a set of over 130 Actions for Adobe Illustrator. They cover a wide range of vintage and modern drop shadows and fills to create beautiful and striking effects for your designs. They can be used on any vectorized type or object. Old Stock creates the effects in vector and separates and groups the shapes for you. All you need to do is apply your own color!

Download it here: http://crtv.mk/feI4

supersonicart:

Phil Noto!

Recent work by the infallible Phil Noto:

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fer1972:

Rock Concert Posters by Chelsey Curtin

cross-connect:

Lindsey Carr is a painter and budding printmaker whose work is heavily influenced by the Natural History artists and engravers of the 18th & 19th century. Primarily oriental or oriental inspired works. 

She’s currently making a Natural History book which attempts to copy the same techniques used by these artists. 

saatchiart:

Annabu Kliewer
South Africa

amroyounes:

The Most Creative Business Cards Ever.

  1. Toy Chair Business Card
  2. Miniature Plumber’s Plunger With Contact Information
  3. Seed Packet Business Card
  4. Bike Multi-Tool Business Card
  5. Classic Rock Theme Business Card: This groovy hair salon comb plays a classic rock theme when rubbed by fingernail, using the same principle as a musicbox comb. 
  6. Transformable Cargo Box Business Card

archatlas:

Cosmópolis Pt.2 Aldo Crusher

scienceninjaturtle:

The DC Comics Art of Bruce Timm

typographybooks:

Just My Type: A Book About Fonts by Simon Garfield.

Just My Type is a book of stories about fonts. It examines how Helvetica and Comic Sans took over the world. It explains why we are still influenced by type choices made more than 500 years ago, and why the T in the Beatles logo is longer than the other letters. It profiles the great originators of type, from Baskerville to Zapf, as well as people like Neville Brody who threw out the rulebook. The book is about that pivotal moment when fonts left the world of Letraset and were loaded onto computers, and typefaces became something we realized we all have an opinion about. And beyond all this, the book reveals what may be the very best and worst fonts in the world – and what your choice of font says about you.

Today we can imagine no simpler everyday artistic freedom than the pull-down font menu. Here is the spill of history, the echo of Johann Gutenberg with every key tap. Here are names we recognize: Helvetica, Times New Roman, Palatino and Gill Sans. Here are the names from folios and flaking manuscripts: Bembo, Baskerville and Caslon. Here are possibilities for flair: Bodoni, Didot and Book Antiqua. And here are the risks of ridicule: Brush Script, Herculanum, Braggadocio and Comic Sans. Twenty years ago we hardly knew them, but now we all have favourites. Computers have rendered us all gods of type, a privilege we could never have anticipated in the age of the typewriter.

Yet when we choose Calibri over Century, or the designer of an advertisement picks Centaur rather than American Gothic, what lies behind our choice and what impression do we hope to create? When we choose a typeface, what are we really saying? Who makes these fonts and how do they work? And just why do we need so many? What are we to do with Alligators, Accolade, Amigo, Alpha Charlie, Acid Queen, Arbuckle, Art Gallery, Ashley Crawford, Arnold Bocklin, Auriol Vignette Sylvie, Andreena, Amorpheus, Angry, and Anytime Now? Banjoman, Bannikova, Baylac, Binner, Bingo, Blacklight, Blippo, Bebedot Blonde, Beach House or Bubble Bath? (And how lovely does Bubble Bath sound, with its thin floating linked circles ready to pop and dampen the page?) There are more than 100,000 fonts in the world. But why can’t we keep to a half-dozen or so familiar faces? Or perhaps we should just stick to the classic Garamond, named after the type designer Claude Garamond, active in Paris in the first half of the sixteenth century, whose highly legible Roman type blew away the heavy fustiness of his German predecessors, and later, adapted by William Caslon in England, would provide the letters for the American Declaration of Independence.

Typefaces are now 560 years old. So when a Brit called Matthew Carter constructed the now-ubiquitous Verdana on his computer in the 1990s, what could he possibly be doing to an A and a B that had never been done before? And how did a friend of his make the typeface Gotham, which eased Barack Obama into the Presidency? And what exactly makes a font presidential or American, or British, French German, Swiss or Jewish? These are arcane mysteries and it is the job of the book to get to the heart of them. But it begins with a cautionary tale, a story of what happens when a typeface gets out of control.

Just My Type from Pentagram on Vimeo.

Get it here:

USAhttp://amzn.to/Lkl6GK
UKhttp://amzn.to/1dz5BX7

Check other books here: typographybooks.tumblr.com